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Fact Sheet

April 15, 2011

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Tax Facts That Matter: 2011 Edition

Note: This report has been updated. View the updated report.

The income group in Oregon that pays the highest share of their income to state and local taxes: Lowest-income taxpayers.[1]

The income group in Oregon that pays the lowest share of their income to state and local taxes: Highest-income taxpayers.[2]

Oregon state and local general revenue as a share of income in 1988: 15.4 percent.[3]

Oregon state and local general revenue as a share of income in 2008: 14.9 percent.[4]

Oregon state and local government spending as a share of income in 1988: 14.7 percent.[5]

Oregon state and local government spending as a share of income in 2008: 15.6 percent.[6]

Share of Oregon income taxes paid by corporations in 1973-75: 18.5 percent.[7]

Share of Oregon income taxes corporations are projected to pay in 2011-13: 6.9 percent.[8]

Anticipated state revenue from personal income taxes in 2011-13: $12 billion.[9]

Anticipated state revenue from the Oregon Lottery in 2011-13: $1.1 billion.[10]

Anticipated revenue from corporate income taxes in 2011-13: $898 million.[11]

2009 federal poverty line for a family of four: $21,947.[12]

Of the 42 states with income taxes, the number that taxed the income of a family of four living at the poverty line in 2009: 13.[13]

State income tax paid in Oregon by a family of four living at the poverty line in 2009: $200.[14]

Oregon’s rank in taxing the income of a family of four living at the poverty line in 2009:
6th highest.[15]

The share of Oregon’s total capital gains income in 2008 that went to the wealthiest 1 percent of taxpayers: 68 percent.[16]

The cost of Governor Kitzhaber’s proposal to give preferential tax treatment to income from capital gains in 2011-13: $25 million.[17]

Cost during 2011-13 budget period of the “accelerated” or “bonus” depreciation corporate tax cut enacted by the Oregon legislature in March 2011: $93 million.[18]

Cost during 2011-13 budget period of the income tax cut scheduled to take effect in January 2012 for the wealthiest 4 percent of Oregonians: $134 million.[19]

Cost during the 2011-13 budget period to increase Oregon’s Earned Income Tax Credit from 6 percent of the federal credit to 9 percent: $43.4 million.[20]

Cost to Oregon of the home mortgage interest deduction in the 2007-09 budget period:
$884.5 million.[21]

Projected cost to Oregon of the home mortgage interest deduction in the 2009-11 budget period:
$1.3 billion.[22]

Projected cost to Oregon of the home mortgage interest deduction in the 2011-13 budget period: $1.6 billion.[23]

Increase in the cost of the home mortgage interest deduction from 2007-09 to 2011-13:
84 percent.[24]

Share of Oregon taxpayers getting no benefit from the home mortgage interest deduction in 2008: 61 percent.[25]

Cost of film tax credits sold for tax year 2010 to raise money for film subsidies:
$7.5 million.[26]

Average profit from the purchase of 2010 film tax credits: 6.9 percent.[27]

Share of profits from film credit purchases going to the wealthiest 5 percent of Oregon taxpayers in tax year 2008: 87 percent.[28]

Profit earned by Ryan Finley, the largest purchaser of film credits for tax year 2010, from his purchase: $94,737.[29]

Number of movies or TV shows Ryan Finley made in Oregon in 2010: 0.

State with the lowest combined state and local business taxes as a share of the economy in 2009, according to the Council on State Taxation (COST): Oregon, tied with Delaware and North Carolina.[30]

State that in 2009 provided the greatest “value” to businesses from the taxes they paid, according to COST: Oregon, tied with Maryland.[31]

Intel revenues in 1996: $20.8 billion.[32]

Amount of Oregon corporate income taxes Intel disclosed it paid in 1996: $54 million.[33]

Intel revenues in 2010: $43.6 billion.[34]

Amount of Oregon corporate income taxes Intel disclosed it paid in 2010: Intel hasn’t disclosed.



Endnotes


1. Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCPP), State & Local Taxes With Temporary PIT & CIT Changes, available at http://www.ocpp.org/2009/iss20091012TaxMeasuresWhoPays_detailCharts.pdf. As a group, taxpayers in the bottom 20 percent of the income scale saw 8.6 percent of their income go to state and local taxes in 2010.

2. OCPP, State & Local Taxes With Temporary PIT & CIT Changes. As a group, the taxpayers in the top 1 percent on the income scale saw 7 percent of their income go to state and local taxes in 2010.

3. OCPP analysis of U.S. Census Bureau, Annual Survey of State and Local Government Finances and Census of Governments, available from the Urban Institute-Brookings Institution Tax Policy Center State and Local Finance Data Query System, at slfdqs.taxpolicycenter.org. Income is personal income plus capital gains, from U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) and Oregon Department of Revenue (DOR). State and local revenue is “own source” general revenue, revenue generated by state and local governments for general purposes.

4. OCPP analysis of Census Bureau, BEA and DOR data. See note 3.

5. OCPP analysis of Census Bureau, BEA and DOR data. See note 3.

6. OCPP analysis of Census Bureau, BEA and DOR data. See note 3.

7. OCPP analysis of data from the Oregon Legislative Revenue Office.

8. Oregon Office of Economic Analysis (OEA), Oregon Economic and Revenue Forecast, March 2011, p. 66, available at http://www.oregon.gov/DAS/OEA/docs/economic/forecast0311.pdf.

9. OEA, Economic and Revenue Forecast, p. 66.

10. OEA, Economic and Revenue Forecast, p. 70.

11. OEA, Economic and Revenue Forecast, p. 66.

12. Oliff, Phil and Ashali Singham, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP), Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families in 2009, April 26, 2010, p. 11.

13. CBPP, Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families, p. 11 and 13.

14. CBPP, Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families, p. 13.

15. CBPP, Impact of State Income Taxes on Low-Income Families, p. 13.

16. OCPP analysis of Department of Revenue data. Capital gains are net capital gains.

17. State of Oregon, 2011-13 Governor’s Balanced Budget, p. O-1.

18. Oregon Legislative Revenue Office (LRO), House Revenue Committee, Exhibit H, SB 301-A Legislative Impact Statement, March 3, 2011.

19. Estimate from Legislative Revenue Office, March 17, 2011 email from Chris Allanach to Chuck Sheketoff.

20. LRO, Preliminary Estimated Revenue Impact of SB 349, emailed to OCPP from Chris Allanach on March 7, 2011. SB 349 phases in an increase of the EITC from 6 percent to 18 percent of the federal credit, in increments of 3 percentage points per year from 2011-14.

21. State of Oregon, 2009-11 Tax Expenditure Report, p. 89.

22. State of Oregon, 2011-13 Tax Expenditure Report, p. 90.

23. State of Oregon, 2011-13 Tax Expenditure Report, p. 90.

24. OCPP calculation based on 2009-11 Tax Expenditure Report and 2011-13 Tax Expenditure Report.

25. OCPP calculation based on 2011-13 Tax Expenditure Report and Oregon Department of Revenue Personal Income Tax Statistics, 2008.

26. Oregon Production Investment Fund, $7.5 Million Maximum Tax Credits - Tax Year 2010, List of Contributions Received, available at http://www.ocpp.org/2011/opif_tax_credits_2010.pdf.

27. Oregon Production Investment Fund.

28. OCPP analysis of 2008 Oregon tax return data provided by the Oregon Department of Revenue.

29. Oregon Production Investment Fund.

30. Council on State Taxation (COST), Total State and Local Business Taxes: State-by-state estimates for fiscal year 2009, March 2010, p. 12, available at http://www.cost.org/Page.aspx?id=69654.

31. COST, Total State and Local Business Taxes, p. 7.

32. Intel 1996 10-K.

33. “Intel Powers Oregon Economy,” Jim Lynch, The Oregonian, December 28, 1997, Page A-1.

34. Intel 2010 10-K

 

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